Coronavirus daily news updates, July 28: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

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Editor’s note: This is a live account of COVID-19 updates from Tuesday, July 28 as the day unfolded. It is no longer being updated. Click here to see all the most recent news about the pandemic, and click here to find additional resources.

Thousands of volunteers helped launch the world’s biggest COVID-19 vaccine trial Monday by testing shots created by the U.S. government. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence visited development sites in North Carolina and Florida, in an attempt to highlight the study that’s one of several candidates racing to develop a vaccine.

Throughout Tuesday, on this page, we’ll be posting Seattle Times journalists’ updates on the outbreak and its effects on the Seattle area, the Pacific Northwest and the world. Updates from Monday can be found here, and all our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

https://www.seattletimes.com/(Jennifer Luxton / The Seattle Times)

Live updates:

Port of Seattle

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Coronavirus: Six ways Covid-19 will change transport across the world

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The Covid-19 pandemic will transform transportation around the world, according to a new report.

There will be an increased use of bicycles and scooters as people seek to avoid congestion as well as a significant reduction in rush hour traffic.

People will likely work from home a lot more as well, the study from the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) said, which will mean smaller crowds on public transport.

The National takes a look at how the coronavirus crisis will permanently change how we commute.

How will the pandemic affect individual transport habits?

The UITP predicts there will be an increase in the use of cars and bicycles and more people will opt to walk to avoid crowded public transport amid physical distancing and hygiene concerns.

“Biking and walking are encouraged by many public authorities through the creation of new ‘green zones’, cycle lanes and pedestrian areas,” the report

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Car Manufacturers That May Not Survive the Coronavirus Pandemic

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Sales of canoes, kayaks, other outdoor gear rebound during the coronavirus pandemic

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MILWAUKEE – On a Thursday morning in mid-March, Darren Bush was poised to open Canoecopia, the largest event of its kind in the world. Bush, the owner of Rutabaga Paddlesports in Monona, Wisconsin, was nervous about the emerging threat of COVID-19, but safer-at-home had not been implemented. 

Vendors from across North America were setting up 250,000 square feet of canoes, kayaks, paddleboards and other outdoor gear for the three-day trade show scheduled to begin the next day, Friday the 13th, at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison.  

Months of work had gone into the planning. About 20,000 people were expected to attend.

Then, Bush got word that Gov. Tony Evers was having a news conference where he declared a public health emergency. 

Bush went home.

On that Thursday, he needed to step away from the pressure of organizing Canoecopia, where scores of small-business owners and salespeople counted on his decisions.

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