Safety

Bicycle Safety – Riding Tips

The Fundamentals – Hand Signals – Hazard Recognition – Tips to Avoid Collisions

Even if you are an experienced cyclist, it’s a good idea to review the fundamentals periodically. You may also want to review them with younger cyclists in your family.

The best guideline is:          Be Alert. Be Wary. Be Seen.

            Be Alert                     Scan ahead, center, left and right.

            Be Wary                    Pay attention to vehicles, pedestrians and others on the road.

            Be Seen                    Use your horn, hand signals and light to be seen by others on the road.

 

 

10 Tips for Safer Cycling

  • Wear your helmet. Follow this simple rule and you reduce your risk of serious injury by as much as 85 percent.
  • Keep your head up and look ahead, not at the ground. You need to see what is coming up so you have time  to react and maneuver.
  • One person per bike. Riding with unsecured
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Hokey Spokes – Brilliant Bicycle Safety Light System 0

 

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“I Want That!”

PC Magazine
“Top Ten Best Gadgets
 for the Ultimate Ride!”

Reader’s Digest
 Holiday Gift Guide

 

World Exhibit of
Innovation, Research
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Brussels
“…for its innovative design and contribution to bicycle safety.”
2nd Place
(Out of 700 Entries
from 30 Countries)

 

  What are Hokey Spokes?

Hokey Spokes Hokey Spokes are transparent “blades” that attach to your bicycle spokes. As these blades spin during riding, a computer inside the blades modulates the internal LED lights so that design images and custom text appear.

The user can decide how many spokes in a variety of colors they want to place on the bicycle wheel. Up to 6 “Blades” can be placed on each wheel. The more blades, the more visibility and persistence of vision at lower speeds. 2 Blades/Wheel look good, 3 Blades/Wheel look great, and more than three look amazing. The rider above has 3 Blades/wheel.

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Bicycle Safety | Motor Vehicle Safety

Photo of a biker wearing jeans riding a bicycle.

How big is the problem?

Deaths and Injuries

In 2015 in the United States, over 1,000 bicyclists died and there were almost 467,000 bicycle-related injuries.3

Cost

Data from 2010 show fatal and non-fatal crash-related injuries to bicyclists resulted in lifetime medical costs and productivity losses of $10 billion.3

What are the major risk factors?

  • Adults aged 50 to 59 years have the highest bicycle death rates.3
  • Children (5-14 years) and adolescents (15-19 years) have the highest rates of nonfatal bicycle-related injuries, accounting for more than one-third of all bicycle-related injuries seen in U.S. emergency departments.3
  • Males die 6 times more often and are injured 4 times more often on bicycles than females.3
  • Most bicyclist deaths occur in urban areas and at non-intersection locations.4
  • Among bicyclist deaths, 37% had alcohol involvement either for the motor vehicle driver or bicycle rider.4

How can bicycle-related injuries

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Public Transportation Agency Safety Plans

Overview

On July 19, 2018, FTA published the Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan (PTASP) Final Rule, which requires certain operators of public transportation systems that receive federal funds under FTA’s Urbanized Area Formula Grants to develop safety plans that include the processes and procedures to implement Safety Management Systems (SMS).  

  • The PTASP rule became effective on July 19, 2019.
  • FTA published a Dear Colleague letter on July 19, 2019, to alert the transit industry of the July 20, 2020 safety compliance deadline.

The plan must include safety performance targets. Find additional guidance on planning and target setting on FTA’s Performance-Based Planning pages. Transit operators also must certify they have a safety plan in place meeting the requirements of the rule by July 20, 2020. The plan must be updated and certified by the transit agency annually.

The rule applies to all operators of public transportation systems that are recipients and

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