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Public Transit Options

Public transportation offers a convenient and easy alternative to gridlocked commutes and high gas prices. Compared to driving, public transit is less expensive, safer and better for the environment. It also significantly reduces traffic congestion, saves energy and benefits the communities it serves. It’s the way millions of Americans commute to work every day. The use of public transportation is growing faster than both vehicle and airplane travel.

Public transportation is available in every county in Pennsylvania, with a wide range of services including:

  • Fixed-route transit service in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 21 small urban areas and 22 rural areas
  • 44 systems offering shared-ride services in all Pennsylvania counties
  • 13 intercity bus routes
  • Keystone Corridor Amtrak service, running from Harrisburg to New York by way of Philadelphia, and Pennsylvanian Amtrak service running from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia
  • 66 counties with rural transportation for persons with disabilities

More and more, Pennsylvania residents are relying

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Los Angeles Public Transit | Discover Los Angeles

The City of Los Angeles Transportation (LADOT) currently operates the second largest fleet in Los Angeles County. LADOT’s transit fleet serves approximately 30 million passenger boardings per year.

DASH Downtown

Six quick bus routes through Downtown depart every five to 15 minutes between 5:50 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays, and every six to 20 minutes between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

  •     Route A – Little Tokyo to City West
  •     Route B – Chinatown to Financial District
  •     Route D – Union Station to South Park
  •     Route E – City West to Fashion District
  •     Route F – Financial District to Exposition Park/USC

DASH also Serves:

  •     Beachwood Canyon
  •     Boyle Heights/East LA
  •     Chesterfield Square
  •     Crenshaw
  •     Downtown Los Angeles
  •     El Sereno/City Terrace
  •     Fairfax
  •     Highland Park/Eagle Rock
  •     Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/West Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/Wilshire
  •     King-East
  •     Leimert/Slauson
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The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April

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Hostile vehicle mitigation | Public Website

Vehicle-borne threats range from vandalism to sophisticated or aggressive attack by determined criminals or terrorists. The mobility and payload capacity of a vehicle offers a convenient delivery mechanism for a large explosive device, although the vehicle itself may be used as a weapon. This section contains guidance that will help practitioners determine the vehicle-borne threat, assess site strengths and vulnerabilities, and identify suitable options for Hostile Vehicle Mitigation (HVM) measures.

Determining the type of vehicle-borne threat being faced

When specifying the nature of the vehicle-borne threat it is important to understand:

  • Modus Operandi (MO) – this includes parked, penetrative, encroachment, deception and duress or a combination of attack methods including surreptitious and forcible attack on the barrier with hand tools or explosives
  • Threat vehicle(s) – unmodified road vehicles with specific characteristics – mass, speed and structure, as well as vehicle specific capabilities
  • Blast effect – especially if considering VBIED attack
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