Pandemic

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April

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Business is booming during pandemic for nonprofit bike shop helping everyone get a bicycle

TAMPA, Fla. — “The whole world wants bikes right now!”

It is safe to say Jon Dengler is the hardest-working man in Tampa’s University Mall right now.

The eerily-silent shopping center still hosts at least one bustling storefront: WellBuilt Bikes.

The shop is a nonprofit repurposing donated bikes and helps anyone get wheels, no matter their financial standing.

“I’ve been joking all week that our racks look like the toilet paper aisle!” says Dengler, who has a small dedicated staff helping him.

Business is booming at WellBuilt right now.

Well Built Bikes 2

WFTS

People without access to transportation are a big part of the clientele. Dengler says bus riders worried about the coronavirus are coming into the store for a safer alternative.

“And then we have all those people who are stuck in their houses and simply want to get outside for some exercise,” Dengler adds.

WellBuilt offers all bikes for all people.

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The safest modes of transportation during a pandemic, ranked

Using public transportation like the subway, a train, or bus can make it difficult to social distance or avoid touching shared surfaces.

subway coronavirus gloves

A person wearing gloves on a public subway train in New York City.

Braulio Jatar/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media/Getty Images


Due to subway line closures and fewer people on the subway, it may be easier to maintain distance between yourself and other passengers.

However, crowded subway cars, trains, and buses can quickly become a hotbed of contaminants due to high foot traffic and riders touching, sneezing, or coughing on shared surfaces.

In order to attempt to curb this, the MTA in New York City has modified its schedules for the Long Island Rail Road and the Metro-North Railroad, and strategically planned its subway line service during “peak” travel times.

“I understand people are trying to get somewhere, but no one should be getting on a crowded train,” Mayor Bill de

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Largo bicycle shop sees businesses booming amid pandemic

LARGO, Fla. (WFLA) – Dan Block has been getting quite the workout lately. Block owns the D & S Bicycle shop on Walsingham Road in Largo and the coronavirus has him working overtime.

“It’s been crazy. Everybody that got their bikes that they’ve had them,” said Block, who fixes those bikes regularly. “Or they buy them at Walmart and they want them assembled, and hey, I’ll do that.”

Dan Block has owned a bike shop in Pinellas County for 42-years and remembers the last time there was a boom in business like this one.

Block explains with the gyms and beaches closed, there are few places to go work out and now many choose to take a bike ride.

Block specializes in bike rentals and sells a few used bikes on the side, but lately, he can’t keep any used inventory in stock.

“I’m limited choices right now,” said Block.

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