Coronavirus

Coronavirus in Pennsylvania

The Latest Guidance

The following counties will move to the yellow phase on May 29:
Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, and
Schuylkill. 17 counties will move to green on May 29: Bradford, Cameron, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango and Warren.



Counties currently in yellow include: Adams, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver Bedford, Blair, Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Cumberland, Elk, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Lawrence, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Montour, Northumberland, Perry, Potter, Snyder, Somerset, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Westmoreland, Wyoming, Wayne, and York.

Pennsylvania is utilizing a three-phase matrix to determine when counties and/or regions are ready to begin easing some restrictions on work, congregate settings, and social interactions. View Governor’s Wolf’s
phased reopening plan for Pennsylvania. View
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Beyond coronavirus: The road ahead for the automotive aftermarket

This article was written collaboratively by the Automotive & Assembly practice. The authors include Alex Brotschi, Daniel Christof, Joe Dertouzos, Sebastian Kempf, and Prashant Vaze.

Every day, healthcare experts and data analysts update models predicting the spread of coronavirus to show the extent of the human tragedy—the number of lives lost, patients hospitalized, and unemployed workers. Despite the intense scrutiny, much uncertainty persists.

Within the automotive sector, COVID-19 is a massive, once-in-a-lifetime disruption, and the situation is changing rapidly. To gain more clarity about the pandemic’s potential impact on the light-vehicle aftermarket—encompassing parts, accessories, and tire sales—we reviewed both past and current trends. First, we looked at previous crises to quantify how demand, revenue, and other aftermarket performance indicators typically change during a downturn. We then considered the current global health crisis and created scenarios showing how the aftermarket might evolve this year, as the pandemic abates, and over

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The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April

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Could Coronavirus Spur Massachusetts To Transform Its Transportation System?

The great pandemic of 2020 may be a steep slide for our economy, but some see it as an unprecedented opportunity to radically transform our aging transit infrastructure and lead to a less car-centric 21st century.

At an online forum hosted by Liveable Streets and Transportation for Massachusetts, Congresswoman Katherine Clark used a phrase from the Depression era to describe what needs to be done to fix the state’s long-neglected transportation system.

“All these areas that are under-funded,” she said, “I hope we can be more in the ‘New Deal’ mindset when we finally get back to legislating around these bigger areas.”

As FDR responded to the Great Depression by pumping federal dollars into the economy for public works projects and jobs, Clark said she thinks it’s time to do the same now.

“This would be a very good time to make the kind of investment — and the size

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