Automotive

Definition of Automotive by Merriam-Webster

au·​to·​mo·​tive | ˌȯ-tə-ˈmō-tiv How to pronounce automotive (audio)

2 : of, relating to, or concerned with self-propelled vehicles or machines

Examples of automotive in a Sentence

The store stocks automotive parts.

Recent Examples on the Web Mining, construction and parts of the North American automotive supply chain were allowed to resume operations this week.

Anchorage Daily News, “Even where virus accelerates, lockdowns are cracking open,” 22 May 2020
The firm’s steel division was already wrestling with a global glut and a sputtering German economy before demand took a further hit as the coronavirus outbreak spread in March, leading to automotive and other factory shutdowns.


William Wilkes, Bloomberg.com, “Thyssenkrupp to Break Up German Giant in Fight for Survival,” 19 May 2020
The Obama administration used three IAMs, including DICE, to determine a dollar value that government should use in cost-benefit analyses for proposed
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definition of automotive by The Free Dictionary

Precise automated production of glass preforms, improved tool and part designs that reduce scrap, and faster-curing resin chemistries are making structural reaction injection molding (SRIM) technology a viable option for high-volume manufacturing of structural automotive parts.
[USPRwire, Wed Sep 04 2019] Global Automotive Trailing Arm Market Overview An automotive trailing arm, also referred to as trailing link is a vehicle suspension design, through which one or more arms are connected between the axle and a pivot point (located on the chassis of a motor vehicle).
[ClickPress, Wed Sep 04 2019] Global Automotive Trailing Arm Market Overview An automotive trailing arm, also referred to as trailing link is a vehicle suspension design, through which one or more arms are connected between the axle and a pivot point (located on the chassis of a motor vehicle).
Applications: Laboratory, automotive, electronics, construction
Awarded on April 1, the estimated four-year, $6 million project
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Beyond coronavirus: The road ahead for the automotive aftermarket

This article was written collaboratively by the Automotive & Assembly practice. The authors include Alex Brotschi, Daniel Christof, Joe Dertouzos, Sebastian Kempf, and Prashant Vaze.

Every day, healthcare experts and data analysts update models predicting the spread of coronavirus to show the extent of the human tragedy—the number of lives lost, patients hospitalized, and unemployed workers. Despite the intense scrutiny, much uncertainty persists.

Within the automotive sector, COVID-19 is a massive, once-in-a-lifetime disruption, and the situation is changing rapidly. To gain more clarity about the pandemic’s potential impact on the light-vehicle aftermarket—encompassing parts, accessories, and tire sales—we reviewed both past and current trends. First, we looked at previous crises to quantify how demand, revenue, and other aftermarket performance indicators typically change during a downturn. We then considered the current global health crisis and created scenarios showing how the aftermarket might evolve this year, as the pandemic abates, and over

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Alternator (automotive) – Wikipedia

Alternator (silver) mounted on a V8 engine

Alternators are used in modern automobiles to charge the battery and to power the electrical system when its engine is running.

Until the 1960s, automobiles used DC dynamo generators with commutators. With the availability of affordable silicon diode rectifiers, alternators were used instead. This was encouraged by the increasing electrical power required for cars in this period, with increasing loads from larger headlamps, electric wipers, heated rear windows and other accessories.

History[edit]

The modern type of vehicle alternators were first used by the military from WWII, to power radio equipment on specialist vehicles.[i] Post-war, other vehicles with high electrical demands, such as ambulances and radio taxis, could also be fitted with optional alternators.[1]

Alternators were first introduced as standard equipment on a production car by the Chrysler Corporation on the Valiant in 1960, several years ahead of Ford

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