Can E-Commerce Revive Coronavirus-Hit Transportation Sector?

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It is a well-known fact that stocks belonging to the transportation  sector are having a tough time due to the coronavirus pandemic. Notably, the health scare was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on Mar 11.

As coronavirus claimed multiple lives, apart from infecting scores across the globe, several countries were under lockdown amid wide-spread travel  restrictions, particularly since March, thereby crippling the transportation sector. In fact, cases are surging even now as economies re-open. For instance, the United States recorded 52,789 new cases on Jul 1, thereby crossing the 50,000 mark in a day for the first time since the COVID-19 outbreak. What is worse is that even more 55,220 cases were registered the following day.

E-Commerce Surge: A Bright Spot

As a result of the pandemic and the current rise in new cases, people are staying indoors and avoiding going out unless absolutely necessary. Consequently, in

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Move to rename ‘Bloody Sunday’ bridge has critics in Selma

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SELMA, Ala. (AP) — Thousands gathered in this river city in 1940 to dedicate a new bridge in honor of white supremacist Edmund Pettus, a Confederate general and reputed Ku Klux Klan leader. Just 25 years later, the bridge became a global landmark when civil rights marchers were beaten at its base.

Today, with thousands protesting nationwide against racial injustice, a years-old push is gaining steam to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge in honor of Rep. John Lewis, who led the 1965 marchers on “Bloody Sunday.” But the idea is drawing opposition in Selma, including from some who marched with Lewis that day.

Pettus’ name has ironically come to also symbolize Black freedom and shouldn’t be painted over, some say. Others oppose the move because Lewis was an outsider who followed in the footsteps of locals who had worked to end segregation for years before he arrived. Still others fear

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Plan For Extra Delays This Fourth Of July Weekend

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SEATTLE, WA — The Fourth of July holiday is always an especially busy time for Washington’s ferries, but the pandemic is likely to make this holiday much, much worse.

The Washington State Department of Transportation, or WSDOT, says that more than 100 of their ferry employees are at high risk for the coronavirus and are unable to work— that has forced them to cut down on the number of daily sailings, which will make wait times and back-ups especially severe when Washingtonians begin to travel for the long weekend.

State Ferries estimate the worst of it will be Thursday for ferries heading westbound, and Sunday for boats heading east as the mass of travelers return home. The longest wait times are likely to be at the Edmonds, Kingston, Mukilteo and Clinton ferry terminals. WSDOT says all of those terminals are already fairly busy, and likely to only get worse through

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In Fine Print, Airlines Make It Harder to Fight for Passenger Rights

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As air travel reopens and flight bookings begin to creep up, AvGeeks — aviation geeks — and others may notice some new legalese in the fine print when they buy plane tickets.

More and more carriers are adding clauses that require passengers to settle disputes with the airline in private arbitration, rather than in court, and bar passengers from starting or joining class-action lawsuits.

In early April, American Airlines updated its contract of carriage, a standard industry document that outlines the legal responsibilities of a ticket holder and an airline, with a class-action waiver. British Airways followed in late May, adding a class-action waiver and binding arbitration agreement in the terms and conditions of Executive Club, its loyalty program, for residents of the United States and Canada. British Airways notified members by email.

“What the airline is saying is: If you ever have a dispute with us, the only way

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