Janette Sadik-Khan: Why The Pandemic Represents A Historic Opportunity For NYC Streets

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During her time as New York City’s transformative transportation commissioner from 2007 to 2013, Janette Sadik-Khan once referred to herself as “basically the largest real-estate developer in New York City.” The remark, while maybe somewhat tongue-in-cheek, reflected the sweeping scope and power in which she approached her job. Rather than simply manage the city’s automobile-focused streets, Sadik-Khan sought to change that biased transportation premise, by adding 400 miles of bike lanes and turning notoriously congested intersections like Times Square into pedestrian plazas. Her policies rankled businesses and car-owning New Yorkers used to casually driving into Manhattan and finding a pre-dinner parking spot. But for a generation of cyclists and urbanists, she became a vanguard whose ideas, once seen as radical, have now become de rigeur in urban planning circles.

Today, Sadik-Khan works as a transportation consultant for Bloomberg Associates, where she advises cities across the world. Not surprisingly, during the

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Taking the New York City streets back before the cars return

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She’s the patron saint of pedestrians in New York City. Bike riders too. And she’s seeing an opportunity like she’s never seen before.

“A once-in-a-generation chance to reimagine our streets and what’s actually possible,” Janette Sadik-Khan said.

As city transportation commissioner for six years under Mayor Mike Bloomberg, Sadik-Khan rerouted more traffic, cleared more bike paths, laid more bus lanes and reorganized more public plazas than anyone in the history of American urban life. She created what became Citi Bike and fundamentally shifted the human and vehicular flow through Times Square and Herald Square. There will be a New York City when this pandemic is finally over. What? You thought a global health crisis would stop her from insisting on more?

“When we used to take a parking spot or two,” she recalled, “it was like we were taking someone’s firstborn child. Now, almost overnight, there are 9,100 outdoor-dining permits

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Free bike repair stations, a new RV adventure company, and comfortable face masks

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Visit this rural NH distillery

Take a road trip to New Hampshire for a tour of Tamworth Distilling, situated on sprawling grounds beneath Mount Whiteface in the Waterville Valley region. The distillery uses house-milled grain, White Mountain water, and herbs and botanicals from the property’s woods and garden. It also incorporates other wilderness-to-table ingredients including wheat, rye, apples, corn, and malt all harvested within a 150-mile radius, to create its unique spirits. Enjoy tastings by the river Sundays through Fridays noon to 4 p.m. or organize a private cocktail class, when staff offer a hands-on workshop and guide you through creating three unique cocktails. The distillery also hosts a Garden Infusions Cocktail Workshop Aug. 14, 6-7 p.m., and an Outdoor Cocktail Class Sept. 18, 6-7 p.m. $30 per person for classes/workshops. 603-323-7196, www.tamworthdistilling.com.

THERE

Mountain bike the Grand Canyon

Bring your family to Nevada and enjoy pedaling along the

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Coronavirus: Six ways Covid-19 will change transport across the world

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The Covid-19 pandemic will transform transportation around the world, according to a new report.

There will be an increased use of bicycles and scooters as people seek to avoid congestion as well as a significant reduction in rush hour traffic.

People will likely work from home a lot more as well, the study from the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) said, which will mean smaller crowds on public transport.

The National takes a look at how the coronavirus crisis will permanently change how we commute.

How will the pandemic affect individual transport habits?

The UITP predicts there will be an increase in the use of cars and bicycles and more people will opt to walk to avoid crowded public transport amid physical distancing and hygiene concerns.

“Biking and walking are encouraged by many public authorities through the creation of new ‘green zones’, cycle lanes and pedestrian areas,” the report

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